Cabbage Soup | In A Village

I can remember stepping into a mud brick building.

They called the space — the kitchen.

Preparing Cabbage | In A Village

There was a boiling cauldron in the room filled with smoke and coals,

— and pieces of ash flying around as if it were Armageddon.

The  cook was trying to boil enough meal to feed thousands of people.

The boat oar swirled with great effort into the big iron pot —

–which once prepared, would be sloshed into bowls where students would line up by the hundreds, before breaking down into groups of three or four, around every prepared bowl,

— to eat the gruel — with their fingers.  

The cook knew the students could not survive only on meal alone — they needed nutrition.

So they would pull cabbage from the field, and chop it up, adding it as a relish to the mix.

It seemed they didn’t have enough.  

Nobody seemed to notice.

Village schools know that children who worry about where their next meal is coming from — are not able to focus as easily on absorbing the lessons from their academic studies.  


To address this, the headmaster created a plan to address the hunger of his students.  The students at different grade levels alternated one day a week each to work in the fields which produced the food that maintained them in their studies. Meals like this cabbage soup recipe make a big difference in small villages.

The process seemed to work.  The students were better nourished than the children who did not participate in the fields, or have access to the program.

Cabbage is one of the world’s healthiest foods, and includes high levels of manganese — which fight cancer, and Vitamin B1, Vitamin K, and gives students a boost of academic energy and mental concentration .  Cabbage is also a food that is easily grown by children.  Try out some cabbage today – with this comforting Cabbage, Sausage & Potato Soup Recipe from Gimme Some Oven.

Click Here For The Cabbage, Sausage & Potato Soup Recipe Made In The Village | From Gimme Some Oven

The short tender cabbage roots need only a little soil to be able to produce a decent volume of food, which means — they could even be produced on the rooftops of inner city schools with minimal efforts — and can grow in the hot tropics or even the mild winters with only a bit of environmental adjustments.  

What if every elementary school in more developed nations planned a four-hour nutritional production course and field into their curriculum?

Surely — it wouldn’t cost as much to keep them nourished, with all of the efforts and hands involved.  From the spirit of Oliver Twist, may every orphan and student whose stomach growls be able to enjoy a second bowl of comforting nutrition.

Click Here For The Recipe We Use In The Village To Make Cabbage, Sausage & Potato Soup | From Gimme Some Oven

We hope that the next time you eat cabbage, you remember the children in the fields.

Have a comment or story to share?  Leave a message below.

Chilean Plums | In A Village

On a trip, far, far away — further than I could walk,

— a trip that happened after a long walk — in a luxurious contraption called a motor car,

— I found a Chilean plum, in a grocery store.

The color was delightful, and I purchased one…

Chilean Plum | In A Village

–to bring back to the village — and feed the children a taste.  

After taking a few videos and pictures with the beautiful fruit —

–we cut it into small pieces, and set it out as a treat for a four-year-old’s birthday, passing the dish around.

The fruit was soft, and juicy, and sweet.

We were careful — to save the seed.

Hoping to see — if it might be possible — to grow something similar in the village.

We all knew that if we could get something like that seed to produce — like a good “Jack and the Beanstalk” story,  the fruit could generate income, and fill nutritional gaps — for the orphans and the widows.  

Something as simple as a good seed could also house, clothe, and educate the widow with the green thumb — or — the struggling young student with the internet connection.

On a different continent, a few weeks later — I went to a grocery store.

 I smiled when I saw the same little plums on the shelf.  My hope — was that the little barefooted children in the far off village where these fruit were produced — were able to go to school by the cost of their produce.  

Some may think that someone as far away as a fruit picker in the subtropical nations doesn’t have an impact on their well-being or daily lives —

— but the fruit was just one glowing example of how far the efforts of their simple labor were able to reach.  The cheery little fruit was brightening the produce baskets in three different corners of the world.

It’s a wonder to me, that people can walk past the fruit in their grocery stores, and really not know the lands or the people they come from.  The fruit has a shorter lifespan, and yet travels further, than most people do.

Read more about human rights and how we are fighting malnutrition with our Rainbow Garden!  

Coming Soon:  How to prepare the plum seed from the fruit.  Subscribe to read the story:

Subscribe: 

 

donate.pinterestingagainstpoverty.org