Baking Pies | In A Village

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Happiness is – a small village, at the ends of the earthwhere children peel potatoes and dice chicken –

-and sauteé apple wedges with cinnamon seasoning – preparing to enjoy – a new dessert after dinner.

Click Here For This Sweet Peach Pie Recipe | Gimme Some Oven (Note: This pie contains bourbon, but other ingredients could also be substituted.)

When making pie for the first time in a village, children work on the ingredients and wonder. “What is this?”  They want to know.

“A pie.”

Children, all over the world, love to play with the doughy crusts, and braid and roll out the dough.  Drips of flour float in the air around their noses, as they wonder what kind of sweet or savory they will use as a filing for today.

There is something so special about pie, that the idea of meat, fruit, and other ingredients enveloped in a circular crust –  has traveled to cultures all over the world.

So what is it like – to bring pies to the far-off village corners?

Wonderful, actually.

Imagine walking into a village full of hungry children – with a new treat to share with them.  That’s – a good day.

The English word “pie” which can be traced back as a common word as early as 1303 A.D. and is thought to be a shortened version of the word “Magpie” – the magpie being a traveling bird that would scavenge almost any kind of food from their environment – much like many of the orphans of the world, today.

Have Children? Try This Easy 5-Minute Rustic Fruite Galette Recipe With Them | Gimme Some Oven

Pies – have been around since the early Romans and have always been presented in a circular form – as if they were truly meant to be enjoyed by all around the world, before Galileo even discovered that the world is – round.

From Asian empanadas, to French tartlets, to Mexican confectionary counters, to Roman pizza pies – the concept of a pastry stuffed with filling is a time-tested and comforting culinary sensation.  Some pies contain alcohol, like this Bourbon Peach Pie recipe.  Culinary artists know that alcohol can enhance the natural flavor and aroma of some foods – but it can also be cooked without it.

The first pies, were actually meat pies.

Pies signify abundance, friendship – and kindness. Pies are a great addition for celebrations, holidays, and more.

A pie crust can be made out of just a few simple ingredients that can be found anywhere.  Every human culture has some kind of grains, eggs, salt, and water or milk in their diet to work from.

From bananas in the subtropics, to apples in the northern regions – from goat meat to chicken or beef – every corner of the world that supports human life boasts of some kind of naturally occurring fruit and protein sources to offer the inhabitants who live there – and all of those diverse flavors can be wrapped up nicely into a pie.  

How To Make A Pie Crust (And Lattice) | Gimme Some Oven

Orphans in this world, deserve their piece of the pie, too.

In our work with Pinteresting Against Poverty – it is so fun to be able to pull some of those starving, hungry little children from little villages around the world – and bake a pie with them.

“If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.” -Mother Teresa

Where savory meats or bubbling sugary, seasonal fruits meet in a communion of flaky, golden crusts – suggesting brotherhood and peace.

There is something spiritual about sharing pies together.  There’s something about the process of baking together – with people around the world – that is special, too.

Using Rudimentary Tools To Bake A Pie Crust In A Village | Pinteresting Against Poverty

Share a pie experience or kindness experience with the orphans and vulnerable children of the world  – by trying out some of our favorite pie recipes by Gimme Some Oven – and consider making a donation to a children’s organization listed on our site today – or make a donation to Pinteresting Against Poverty to support our projects in a village- mail your checks to PO BOX 26074, Overland Park, KS 66225.

Whether in your own kitchen, or in a village – children can use almost any flat edge circular object to roll out the dough.  We’ve used cans of food, and glass bottles.  Sometimes you are lucky enough to have butter available, but sometimes you have to resort to other oils, for example, coconut oil might be a good substitute for butter if you are located too far away from convenience stores.

Click Here To Learn How We Make Pie Crusts In A Village | Pinteresting Against Poverty

Click here to read about one of our first experiences making pie with children in the village. (Post Coming Soon.)

Tell us your favorite pie stories and recipes here:

Click Here For The Best Cherry Pie Recipe | From Gimme Some Oven

Welcome to Pinteresting Against Poverty. Share our posts with your friends!  Learn more about our work and our village by watching the video below:

Author: Ada Nicole

A human rights worker in developing nations.

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