Fresh Kale | For A Village

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Oh, greens.

Especially winter greens.

Pasta-with-Italian-Sausage-Mushrooms-and-Kale-Recipe-5-320x480
Try This Great Pasta with Italian Sausage, Kale & Mushrooms | Gimme Some Oven

My son and I used to grow kale outside of our back doorstep in a little wooden-box raised garden.

The kale bloomed throughout the whole winter, loving the warm concrete from the heater inside.  

Kale is a cold-weather green that tastes good in warm, comforting winter soups – and as a compliment to potatoes, and is even sweeter after surviving the frosts.

Kale is one of the only greens that it is hard to get children to like without some kind of cooking – or alteration, and not all cooks are up to the challenge.

That said, we’ve learned that kale tastes great, and can be sweet, salty, savory – soup-y or even mixed up in an apple-smoothie –

-but it isn’t the greatest straight-off-of-the-block without some kind of dressing.  With children, sometimes you just have to thank your lucky stars when the right dressing comes along.

Dogs may turn up their noses at kale – but that is one of the many reasons why dogs are not children.  And of course, the odd dog will eat kale if it’s covered in bacon – if you know what I mean.  No use in comparing the two if you are loved by both – just nourish what feels healthy on your plate.

Kale, as well as it grows well outdoors in the cold – is even better warmed, and toasted in the oven with oil – those roasted little leaves are as consumable as potato chips.

What makes kale worth the trouble – is the level of nutrition packed into those curly little snowflake-tolerant leaves.

Kale seeds are small and round – and look a lot like cabbage seeds | Pinteresting Against Poverty

Kale can also be a bright violet color – and some varieties are so pretty they are used in mixed-baskets for mere decoration and accents.

Kale is considered to be a less domesticated form – a wild, adventurous family member – of the more cultivated but less distinct – yet always comforting cabbage – which we just can’t seem to get enough of, these days.

Kale was one of the new greens that I wanted to introduce to the children of the village, as it can grow in almost any climate – and is known from Russia to South Africa, from Chile to Alaska – and is full of micronutrients.

I’ve also experimented in growing kale in a vertical PVC pipe – which is a project I hope to post about soon – on vertical gardens.

If you are feeling like you need better nourishment – try adding some kale to your regular diet with some of these great recipes!

Love Kale?  Love nutrition? Kale – isn’t exactly optional once you know how good it is.  It’s not for everyone, but those who crave it after trying it probably need kale especially and exclusively – on their dinner plate – or their breakfast smoothie or lunch salad bar – and would be blessed by it’s adventurous goodness.  And then, off to dessert!

(More edits coming soon.)

 

Author: Ada Nicole

A human rights worker in developing nations.

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