Chilean Plums | In A Village

On a trip, far, far away — further than I could walk,

— a trip that happened after a long walk — in a luxurious contraption called a motor car,

— I found a Chilean plum, in a grocery store.

The color was delightful, and I purchased one…

Chilean Plum | In A Village

–to bring back to the village — and feed the children a taste.  

After taking a few videos and pictures with the beautiful fruit —

–we cut it into small pieces, and set it out as a treat for a four-year-old’s birthday, passing the dish around.

The fruit was soft, and juicy, and sweet.

We were careful — to save the seed.

Hoping to see — if it might be possible — to grow something similar in the village.

We all knew that if we could get something like that seed to produce — like a good “Jack and the Beanstalk” story,  the fruit could generate income, and fill nutritional gaps — for the orphans and the widows.  

Something as simple as a good seed could also house, clothe, and educate the widow with the green thumb — or — the struggling young student with the internet connection.

On a different continent, a few weeks later — I went to a grocery store.

 I smiled when I saw the same little plums on the shelf.  My hope — was that the little barefooted children in the far off village where these fruit were produced — were able to go to school by the cost of their produce.  

Some may think that someone as far away as a fruit picker in the subtropical nations doesn’t have an impact on their well-being or daily lives —

— but the fruit was just one glowing example of how far the efforts of their simple labor were able to reach.  The cheery little fruit was brightening the produce baskets in three different corners of the world.

It’s a wonder to me, that people can walk past the fruit in their grocery stores, and really not know the lands or the people they come from.  The fruit has a shorter lifespan, and yet travels further, than most people do.

Read more about human rights and how we are fighting malnutrition with our Rainbow Garden!  

Coming Soon:  How to prepare the plum seed from the fruit.  Subscribe to read the story:

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Why Do We Need Shoes? | In A Village

The mud…

is not only… dirty.

The mud, is not only inescapable and slippery —

— to those who can’t afford to pay for proper shoes.

The mud is a pathway to parasites,

…which crawl in through painful sores in the feet,

and climb the legs to lay eggs in the lungs of it’s victims.

The mud isn’t only dirty…

it’s plagued with a herpes virus —

— that causes cancer.

The mud, and an absence of proper shoes…

— is one of the reasons why there are so many orphans

— in the village.

Did you know that there are viruses in the soil, which damage children’s health?  Help us to raise awareness by sharing this post on your social media.  Sometimes barefoot isn’t an option.  Click on the link below to visit our store and make a general donation to support children’s rights – including shoes for their feet:

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Scissors

You may think — that it is easy to help a widow in a village.

I can tell you from experience: It isn’t.

As the widows stand in a strange doorway — encouraged by their friends to investigate a new work opportunity,

— several realize, as theirs hearts beat fast —

— that if they were — not– by my side hoping for our help —

— that they would be doing something — that they know how to do. They would not have to to conquer any of the insecurities — of a task unknown.

A lack of formal education leaves many feeling shame — and with a fear that they can’t learn. Many — understandably — fear opportunities — more than they hope — for the good of them.

But not all — are so fearful. Some are brave.

Their bravery — creates a challenge — of it’s own.

One widow, who had a better education before she was removed to the village of the destitute (as women are not allowed to own property) spoke up — encouraged by the opportunity to work with an international NGO. She had once been advised of her labor rights, and her act of bravery was putting those long-lost lessons to the test. She knew to ask foreigners harsh questions and negotiate a good deal. The only problem? That foreigner — happened to be — me.

“Now. You!” She says in a way that makes me jump. “You say that YOU want to have a rug of these cloths.”

“Yes.” It was true.

“You! say that you! will pay us to do this work. Is THAT the truth?”

“Yes.” I answered honestly. We were ordered to get a rug for our facilities, but thought perhaps we could make one out of our old clothes. Instead of buying a rug — we decided to try to hire the widows, to give them a day’s work at a man’s wage.

“And…” she pauses, “How is it that you! expect us to cut these cloths?” As she points to the teetering tower of rags and remnants.

I’m already a little bit tired of being ‘me'(!). I looked back at the teetering pile of unsalvagable laundry.

It’s important to say that knives are used — to do — just about everything in the village. A knife can be used as a fork, knives — can cut grass, protect from thieves, deliver babies, cut umbilical cords, prepare foods — they can be heated to repair the soles of shoes — and cut clothes.

I forgot to ask them — to bring their own tools today.  I admitted this, blushing.

“Well, well.” Says the widow. “You! are not prepared for us laborers!” She cackled.

“I’m sure we can find something to use.” Confidently, and a little more tired — I sent children to rush around looking for supplies.

Out of knowledge, I asked, “Now, what would you use at home?”

The widow laughed, slapped her knee — and started to dance — with her hands making cutting motions. “What do you call theese!!” Her arms cut through the air as she giggled.

I blushed. “Scissors.”

“YEs! YEs!” She cackled, and the women also blushed. “We need your little — contraptions! Those little machines!! That do like this!” She laughed and danced cutting with her fingers through the air — and some of the anxieties. If we were unprepared, it was enough that — in the humor of the moment — the other women were relaxing and also hiding their smiles.

I still blushed. It was funny.

After all — how did any civilization get so “advanced” that we needed something as complicated as scissors to cut up cloth? It did seem funny, in the village.

“So when can we start?” Asked the widow.

“Right now if you’d like.”

Children were showing up with all kinds of sharp edges, offering their possiblities. There were a few pairs of Crayola scissors included in the mix — that I was both ashamed and proud of.

“We need to have the rug — before the magistrate comes to re-inspect. They never tell us what time they are coming — so — I hope by the end of the week we can be finished.” I explained.

Still laughing, the widow cackled with a dry voice pretending to be an uppity movie star, “We need 50,000 each to be properly equipped to do your job. And we get to keep the tools. Agreed?”

In other words, they were asking for about $70 worth of scissors.

I laughed. The widow went solemn. “We are widows.” She said all of a sudden seriously.

I nodded in acknowledgement of the title.

“You have to respect our rights, and equip us as you would have yourself equipped. Otherwise we cannot work for you.”

I sighed. It was going to be a long day.

And they wanted scissors.

This is how projecting with the widows started.

Welcome to Pinteresting Against Poverty.  

We invite you to follow along, and read with us, as we try to use projects to save a village.   We invite you to cheer for the children and widows of poverty — and their stories and successes — as if they were your favorite football team.

Donate A Pinterest Project Online Today and Support This Work: Click Here.

Click Here to read the rest of the story about the rug.

We have a goal to raise $100,000 this year to support orphans and vulnerable children in this village.  Click below to make a tax-deductible contribution of any amount today.

 

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Posts Coming soon: Planting Our Own Multi-Vitamins | Filling Nutritional Gaps in a Hungry Village

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Scissors | In A Village

You may think — that it is easy to help a widow in a village.

I can tell you from experience: It isn’t.

As the widows stand in a strange doorway — encouraged by their friends to investigate a new work opportunity,

— several realize, as theirs hearts beat fast —

— that if they were — not– by my side hoping for our help —

— that they would be doing something — that they know how to do. They would not have to to conquer any of the insecurities — of a task unknown.

A lack of formal education leaves many feeling shame — and with a fear that they can’t learn. Many — understandably — fear opportunities — more than they hope — for the good of them.

But not all — are so fearful. Some are brave.

Scissors | Stories From Widows In A Village

Their bravery — creates a challenge — of it’s own.  

One widow, who had a better education before she was removed to the village of the destitute (as women are not allowed to own property) spoke up — encouraged by the opportunity to work with an international NGO. She had once been advised of her labor rights, and her act of bravery was putting those long-lost lessons to the test. She knew to ask foreigners harsh questions and negotiate a good deal. The only problem? That foreigner — happened to be — me.

“Now. You!” She says in a way that makes me jump. “You say that YOU want to have a rug of these cloths.”

“Yes.” It was true.

“You! say that you! will pay us to do this work. Is THAT the truth?”

Read About Other Projects | Pinteresting Against Poverty

“Yes.” I answered honestly. We were ordered to get a rug for our facilities, but thought perhaps we could make one out of our old clothes. Instead of buying a rug — we decided to try to hire the widows, to give them a day’s work at a man’s wage.

“And…” she pauses, “How is it that you! expect us to cut these cloths?” As she points to the teetering tower of rags and remnants.

I’m already a little bit tired of being ‘me'(!). I looked back at the teetering pile of unsalvagable laundry.

It’s important to say that knives are used — to do — just about everything in the village. A knife can be used as a fork, knives — can cut grass, protect from thieves, deliver babies, cut umbilical cords, prepare foods — they can be heated to repair the soles of shoes — and cut clothes. 

Bunk-a-Beds
Read About Our Bunk-A-Bedding Project | In A Village

I forgot to ask them — to bring their own tools today.  I admitted this, blushing.

“Well, well.” Says the widow. “You! are not prepared for us laborers!” She cackled.

“I’m sure we can find something to use.” Confidently, and a little more tired — I sent children to rush around looking for supplies.

Out of knowledge, I asked, “Now, what would you use at home?”

The widow laughed, slapped her knee — and started to dance — with her hands making cutting motions. “What do you call theese!!” Her arms cut through the air as she giggled.

I blushed. “Scissors.”

“YEs! YEs!” She cackled, and the women also blushed. “We need your little — contraptions! Those little machines!! That do like this!” She laughed and danced cutting with her fingers through the air — and some of the anxieties. If we were unprepared, it was enough that — in the humor of the moment — the other women were relaxing and also hiding their smiles.

I still blushed. It was funny.

After all — how did any civilization get so “advanced” that we needed something as complicated as scissors to cut up cloth? It did seem funny, in the village.

“So when can we start?” Asked the widow.

“Right now if you’d like.”

Children were showing up with all kinds of sharp edges, offering their possiblities. There were a few pairs of Crayola scissors included in the mix — that I was both ashamed and proud of.

“We need to have the rug — before the magistrate comes to re-inspect. They never tell us what time they are coming — so — I hope by the end of the week we can be finished.” I explained.

Still laughing, the widow cackled with a dry voice pretending to be an uppity movie star, “We need 50,000 each to be properly equipped to do your job. And we get to keep the tools. Agreed?”

In other words, they were asking for about $70 worth of scissors.

I laughed. The widow went solemn. “We are widows.” She said all of a sudden seriously.

I nodded in acknowledgement of the title.

“You have to respect our rights, and equip us as you would have yourself equipped. Otherwise we cannot work for you.”

I sighed. It was going to be a long day.

And they wanted scissors.

This is how projecting with the widows started.

Welcome to Pinteresting Against Poverty.  

(A special note to my son if he happens to see this post:  No child, I did not chop up your blanket into little pieces – I just used it for the picture.  Don’t worry.  Sending you a kiss on the cheek, and wishing you a good first day of school.)

We invite you to follow along, and read with us, as we try to use projects to save a village.   We invite you to cheer for the children and widows of poverty — and their storie and successes — as if they were your favorite football team.

Donate A Pinterest Project Online Today and Support This Work: Click Here

Click Here to read the rest of the story about the rug.

We have a goal to raise $100,000 this year to support orphans and vulnerable children in this village.  Click below to make a tax-deductible contribution of any amount today.

Click Here To Make A Donation To Our Village | Pinteresting Against Poverty

Posts Coming soon: Planting Our Own Multi-Vitamins | Filling Nutritional Gaps in a Hungry Village

Have a comment or question? Feel free to contact us below!:

Tomatoes, Peppers and Onions

“Is it big enough?”

You know despite the many languages the children speak…

— this is the question running through their mind every time their little knees bend to weed around the new vegetable.  

The new “it” is a green pepper plant this time.  Newly planted.

It’s a fruit they have never tasted before.  

Click Here for a printable Easy Roasted Red Pepper Sauce Recipe | Gimme Some Oven

“Does it need more water?”  Worries a little one, looking at the white flowers and angular green leaves.

“No.”  It might actually be smaller due to all of the love it’s gotten.  The plants are a bit hardier than they think, and are more suitable to desert climates, or dry seasons.

“I know I am really going to like this.”  Says the widow, watching over the plant one afternoon.

There had to be at least twenty people standing around the pan on the day we picked this pepper.

All had to be fed.  Myself included.  

The vegetables were flavored with a new vitamin-packed fiber treat.

They were not aware of how big the vegetable would grow, and needed guidance, one dared to pick one of the small fruits to add to our dinner pot a bit early.

The children were very happy with the flavorful introduction of green peppers to their diet, and can’t wait to pick them.

They are beginning to learn, is that a green pepper, is not only green.  The fruits will go through a delightful color change as they are allowed to age.

There are brilliant reds, and oranges, and yellows —

The children planted their first pepper seed gently in an eggshell, to test the soil and conditions. Later, when the plant was stronger, they transplanted it outside.

as soon as they are not so hungry to have to pick them green.  Then they can enjoy meals such as this Roasted Red Pepper Sauce Recipe from Gimme Some Oven.  

Peppers contain a lot of nutrition that the villagers lack, such as potassium, and vitamin A, vitamin B, niacin, and dietary fiber.  Peppers can grow decently in dry or drought environments.  In the village, we poured our tomato and pepper sauce over rice and corn meal, but the children have a special love for all things ‘noodle’, and every once in a while we splurge for a bag of pasta – especially on holidays – and sometimes for art projects and decorations.

We are always in need of more vegetables for the village.  If you would like to contribute towards a Pinterest project such as this, please make a donation at this link, today:  Click Here.

The children are busy planting their second garden of the year this week, but hopefully we’ll have more pepper videos and recipes to come, soon.

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Chilean Plums

On a trip, far, far away — further than I could walk,

— a trip that happened after a long walk — in a luxurious contraption called a motor car,

— I found a Chilean plum, in a grocery store.

The color was delightful, and I purchased one…

–to bring back to the village — and feed the children a taste.

After taking a few videos and pictures with the beautiful fruit —

–we cut it into small pieces, and set it out as a treat for a four-year-old’s birthday, passing the dish around.

The fruit was soft, and juicy, and sweet.

We were careful — to save the seed.

Hoping to see — if it might be possible — to grow something similar in the village.

We all knew that if we could get something like that seed to produce — like a good “Jack and the Beanstalk” story,  the fruit could generate income, and fill nutritional gaps — for the orphans and the widows.  

Something as simple as a good seed could also house, clothe, and educate the widow with the green thumb — or — the struggling young student with the internet connection.

On a different continent, a few weeks later — I went to a grocery store.

 I smiled when I saw the same little plums on the shelf.  My hope — was that the little barefooted children in the far off village where these fruit were produced — were able to go to school by the cost of their produce.  

Some may think that someone as far away as a fruit picker in the subtropical nations doesn’t have an impact on their well-being or daily lives —

— but the fruit was just one glowing example of how far the efforts of their simple labor were able to reach.  The cheery little fruit was brightening the produce baskets in three different corners of the world.

It’s a wonder to me, that people can walk past the fruit in their grocery stores, and really not know the lands or the people they come from.  The fruit has a shorter lifespan, and yet travels further, than most people do.

Coming Soon:  How to prepare the plum seed from the fruit.  Subscribe to read the story:

Subscribe: 

 

How to Eat Fried Caterpillars

I was sweaty, hungry —

— and in need of enough clean water to take a bath.

I had been too busy directing children to even ask what the meal plan might be for the day.

I wasn’t very good at directing the daily suppers — I wasn’t as used to the local supplies and diet.  I had once tried to cook a side of beef over the fire when the electricity went out.   It was about the only time I’ve ever seen malnourished children look sad and reluctant — to eat red meat.

I smelled something cooking.  It smelled meaty, and potato-chippy.

From the smell you could tell it was oily, and crunchy.

I wondered by the kitchen, lured by the toasty smell — and almost gagged at the sight of the creatures in the pan.

“What are — those?”  I asked in disbelief.

“Caterpillars.”  Said the cook grinning.  And she — crunched —

— into one, like a bright orange Cheeto.  Except — these were neon yellow.   If that mattered.

Miserably, I made my way back into the bedroom.

I had to have a conversation with myself —

a serious conversation — about why I didn’t want to eat caterpillars for dinner.

Recipe:

Widow's Fried Caterpillars

Caterpillars are a source of high protein, and have the same consistency as Cheetos. If you were brave, you could also add chili pepper to taste. Garlic salt would also help consumers to avoid intestinal parasites.

Servings: This recipe would probably serve about 9-12 (The people who eat these meals usually don’t get their bellies full, because they share with too many people.)

Ingredient substitution: Many widows cannot afford the oil to prepare the meal or the coals to heat it over. It is not recommended to eat the caterpillars without cooking them. If you can find any way possible, try to add the oil to your meal.

  • 1/2 lb bag of dead caterpillars
  • 1/2 cup of corn oil
  • salt to taste
  • banana coals
  • 1 match
  • 1 bundle of wild grass

Prepare the grass in the brasier underneath the coals

Catch the grass on fire, to ignite the coals

Heat the coals over the fire, wait until golden and the heat is well-distributed

Put your fire safe pan over the brazier

Add the precious oil to the pan, making sure to cover the whole bottom surface

Add caterpillars to the oil once it is hot enough to pop

Cook throughly -- they are ready when they break against the side of the pan like potato chips

Salt to taste

Crunch away!

Post about the nutritional value of bugs:  Coming Soon.

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A Lion Matters

When I heard…

that a fellow countryman… a dentist…

paid a price…

…to be allowed to kill a lion,

a chill went across my heart, and goosebumps rose underneath the fine hairs on my arms.

My first thought was, “They don’t know what they are doing.”

There is something sacred about a lion.

A real lion.

A lion that lives in the wilderness.

There is a pride — that’s missing — and a shame that’s present, in such an action.

I thought of some of the hungry little children I’ve cuddled.

One of them, dying.

And how his whole body relaxed, and how he sank so happily, glowing into the soft bed I put him in, at the sharing of a lion story.

“Liiii oooooooooonnn!!!” The ailing little boy roared from the bottom of, and with all of the air he had left in his rattling chest.

The animal had a strength that the child did not.

A strength that the child admired.

A strength that all children admire.

What kind of man, would travel thousands of miles, and pay money over the heads of their starving little bodies — for the “privilege”

— of killing their mascot?

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Each post is designed to teach you something new about human rights issues — in about 30 seconds of narrative stories.